Boeing 767 for sale

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  • Boeing 767 for sale and lease – Price on request

Boeing 767-300ER
1995 (YEAR)
84700 (TTAF)
POR

Boeing 737-800
2017 (YEAR)
20 (TTAF)
POR

Boeing 737-500
1998 (YEAR)
32350 (TTAF)
POR

Boeing 737-500
1997 (YEAR)
40400 (TTAF)
POR

Boeing 787-8
2017 (YEAR)
20 (TTAF)
POR

Boeing 737-400
1999 (YEAR)
47300 (TTAF)
POR

Boeing 737-800
2010 (YEAR)
26500 (TTAF)
POR

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mail @ jet588 . com

 

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Information about Boeing 767

The Boeing 767 is a wide-bodied long-haul aircraft manufactured by the American firm Boeing. It is one of the most common transatlantic cruise liners. Commercial operation of the Boeing 767 began in 1982, since then more than a thousand aircraft have been sold.

First flight and test

The prototype aircraft with registration number N767BA, equipped with Pratt & Whitney JT9D turboprop engines, was rolled out of the hangar on August 4, 1981. By that time, 173 firm orders were received from 17 airlines, including: Air Canada, All Nippon Airways, Britannia Airways, Transbrazil and Trans World Airlines.
On September 26, 1981, the Boeing 767 made its first flight under the command of test pilots Tommy Edmonds, Lew Wallick and John Brit. The first flight passed without complications, except for the problems with the chassis, which arose because of leaked hydraulic fluid.
Test flights and tests of the Boeing 767 lasted for 10 months. Especially for this was built 6 copies. The first four aircraft were equipped with JT9D engines, and the remaining two CF6. Five aircraft were used to test avionics and flight control systems, and the sixth tested the physical capabilities of the liner. During the test, the pilots described the 767 as “easy to drive, but with nuances in maneuverability peculiar to large wide-body aircraft”.
In July 1982, after 1600 flight test hours, the 767-200 with JT9D engines was certified by the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).
On August 19, 1982, United Airlines became the first operator of the Boeing 767-200.
In September 1982, 767-200 was certified with CF6 engines. Delta Airlines began shipping in October 1982.

New technologies

By the end of the 1970s, aerospace technology had leaped forward and a new aircraft received the most advanced ones. In addition to the above-mentioned engines of the new generation, the liner received more efficient aerodynamic solutions, part of the fuselage was made of composite materials. All this made it possible to lighten the weight of the ship, reduce fuel consumption and take on board as many passengers as possible.

The same technologies were applied to the 7N7 project, which later turned into one of the most successful aircraft – Boeing 757. The cockpits of both aircraft were unified, which made it possible to train the crew in two types at once, and this in turn reduced the costs of airlines for crew retraining.

The similarity of the cabs 767 and 757 was that for the first time in history, part of the analog electromechanical dial gauges were replaced with cathode-ray tube displays. The crew was reduced to 2 people, and the Flight Management System (FMS) coped with the functions of the navigator, which, in addition, had a lot of opportunities. Since then, cabs with similar equipment are called “glass” or “glass cockpit”.

Start of production of the Boeing 767

In January 1978, Boeing announced the expansion of the plant in Everett, which was built in the late 1960s specifically for the production of 747. It was assumed that the new aircraft, which received the designation 767 by that time, would be produced there.
Boeing planned to produce three modifications: 767-100 (capacity 190 passengers), 767-200 (capacity 210 passengers) and three-engine 767 MR / LR (capacity 200 passengers). Subsequently, the 767 MR / LR was renamed the 777, became a twin-engine liner, and its capacity was increased to 440 passengers.

Production of the first 767 began on July 14, 1978, after United Airlines ordered 30 767-200 aircraft. After some time, an order was received for 50 767-200 aircraft from American Airlines and Delta Airlines.
As for the modification 767-100, it turned out to be of no interest to the airlines, since its characteristics overlapped with the Boeing 757.

Most importantly – operating costs

By the end of the 1970s, minimum operating costs became the main criterion for airline purchases of aircraft. Boeing had foreseen this, so fuel efficiency was built into the 767 even during the design process. Compared with its predecessors, the aircraft was 20-30% more economical. Engineers managed to achieve such results due to new technologies in wing design, as well as new engines. At the same time, technical progress made it possible to design one-third of the 767 drawings using computers, and in the wind tunnel the test mock-up of the airliner spent about 26,000 hours.

Boeing simultaneously designed two aircraft 767 and 757. In the end, both airliners received similar design solutions, in particular: avionics, flight control systems and various units. In general, the development of both aircraft company Boeing spent about $ 3.5 – $ 4 billion.

Boeing 767 modifications:

  • Boeing 767-200(ER)
  • Boeing 767-300(ER/F)
  • Boeing 767-400ER
Variant 767-200(ER) 767-300(ER/F) 767-400ER
Cockpit crew Two
3-class 174 (15F, 40J, 119Y) 210 (18F, 42J, 150Y) 243 (16F, 36J, 189Y)
2-class 214 (18J, 196Y) 261 (24J, 237Y) 296 (24J, 272Y)
1-class 245Y (290) 290Y (351) 409Y (375)
Cargo 3,070 ft³ / 86.9 m³ 4,030 ft³ / 114.1 m³ 4,905 ft³ / 138.9 m³
ULDs 22 LD2s 30 LD2s 38 LD2s
Length 159 ft 2 in / 48.51 m 180 ft 3 in / 54.94 m 201 ft 4 in / 61.37 m
Wingspan 156 ft 1 in / 47.57 m 170 ft 4 in / 51.92 m
Wing 3,050 ft² / 283.3 m², 31.5° sweepback 3,130 ft² / 290.7 m²
Fuselage 17 ft 9 in / 5.41 m height, 16 ft 6 in / 5.03 m width, 186 in/ 4.72 m Cabin width(pp30)
MTOW std: 315,000 lb / 142,882 kg
ER: 395,000 lb / 179,169 kg
std: 350,000 lb / 158,758 kg
ER/F: 412,000 lb / 186,880 kg
450,000 lb / 204,116 kg
Max. payload 73,350 lb (33,271 kg)
ER: 78,390 lb (35,557 kg)
88,250 lb (40,030 kg)
ER: 96,560 lb (43,799 kg)
101,000 lb (45,813 kg)
OEW 176,650 lb / 80,127 kg
ER: 181,610 lb / 82,377 kg
189,750 lb / 86,069 kg
ER: 198,440 lb / 90,011 kg
229,000 lb / 103,872 kg
Fuel capacity std: 16,700 USgal / 63,217 L (111,890 lb / 50,753 kg ), ER: 24,140 USgal / 91,380 L (161,740 lb / 73,364 kg)
Range std: 3,900 nmi (7,200 km)(p47)
ER: 6,590 nmi / 12,200 km
std: 3,900 nmi (7,200 km)(p49)
ER: 5,980 nmi / 11,070 km
5,625 nmi / 10,415 km
Cruise Long range: 459 kn (850 km/h), Maximum: 486 kn (900 km/h) at 39,000 ft (12,000 m), Ceiling: 43,100 ft (13,100 m)
Takeoff std: 6,300 ft (1,900 m)(p58)
ER: 2,480 m / 8,150 ft
9,200 ft (2,800 m)(p64)
ER/F: 2,650 m / 8,700 ft
3,290 m / 10,800 ft
Engines (×2) std: P&W JT9D / PW4000 / GE CF6-80 (ER: +RB211-524) ER/F: PW4000 / GE CF6-80 / RB211-524 (std: +P&W JT9D) GE CF6-80 / PW4000
Thrust (×2) std: 48,000–52,500 lbf (214–234 kN)
ER: 48,000–60,600 lbf (214–270 kN)
std: 48,000–60,600 lbf (214–270 kN)
ER/F: 56,750–61,500 lbf (252–274 kN)
60,600 lbf (270 kN)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_767

Jet588 - Boeing 767 for sale

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